YARD OF ALE  

Scotland's Favourite Folk n' Fun Band

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Reviews

 

 

 

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Caledonian Folk and Blues at the Guildford August 2012

Yard of Ale are currently enjoying their fortieth year of playing as a band. Consequently they rattle through their shows with familiarity. They’re comfortable with playing old classics as well as new-found tracks, incorporating a range of Americana, bluegrass and Irish folk songs into their performance alongside Scottish and English folk songs. They’re an intelligent act, pairing the Jacobite tune ‘Killiecrankie’ with the Robbie Burns song ‘Ye Jacobites By Name’ and clearly relishing the experience.

Yard of Ale introduced the second act of the evening between their two sets: ragtime legend Eddie Walker took the stage, though every night a different guest will play. Walker played old hits such as ‘Speed of the Sound of Loneliness’ next to his own tracks, winning the crowd over easily.

Whilst well below the radar of most Fringe-goers, a visit to the Guildford Arms – a gorgeous pub in the heart of the New Town, complete with its Victorian fittings – makes for an excellent setting for a folk festival. For fans of folk music, Yard of Ale are a lot of fun; rowdy, red-faced and masters of their craft. For the uninitiated, it makes for a compelling experience, especially for those tiring of the central Fringe circuit.

Reviewer : Sam Bradley

Originally published here, on Broadway Baby. Also published here, on Dauphin at the Fringe.

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one 4 review

 

 

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Caledonian Folk and Blues at the Guildford – Yard of Ale

Posted on by one4review

One of the best Fringe traditions is the free Folk and Blues show put on at The Guildford Arms, located off the east end of Princes Street. Each year, the show is hosted by the Yard of Ale, stalwarts of the Scottish folk scene. Indeed, this year marks the 40th anniversary of the band’s formation.

The four guys know how to entertain with an eclectic mix of songs. It all stems from their excellent musicianship on guitars, with some banjo, mandolin and fiddle appearing in the mix.

Naturally, they perform numerous Scottish and Irish favourites, opening their set with Braes of Killiekrankie. As well as their traditional folk song repertoire, they broaden out to include songs from Steve Earle, Bob Dylan, Rick Nelson and Lindisfarne. I particularly enjoyed their version of Guy Mitchell’s Singin’ the Blues. They end their set with the marvellous Girl from Belfast City.

All through the show, many join in the choruses with obvious enjoyment and good humour. The whole experience is enhanced by the wide choice of real ale available.

                         Reviewed by Ben  Douglas                                         one 4 review

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one 4 review

 

one 4 review

 

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T in the Car Park – 2 January 2011

Posted on by one4review

Firstly, a Happy New Year from all of us at one4review. I really hope 2011 is better for us all than 2010.

And what better way to bring in the New Year was the now traditional outside gig entitled ‘T in the Car Park’, hosted by those ubiquitous folk band Yard of Ale in the car park of the Aberdour Hotel in the Fife village of the same name.

Now it is a testament to both the venue and the musicians that in excess of 200 souls braved the near freezing temperatures for three hours, okay the bar was open and the burger and soup stands were doing a roaring trade throughout, but most were there for the music.

Starting off proceedings promptly at 2-00pm Yard of Ale comprising Alistair McDougald, Colin MacKenzie and Peter Gillan were well into their stride and royally entertained with their usual mix of traditional Scottish folk tunes, Irish, American numbers the odd country number, even an excursion to rock ‘n’ roll all interspersed with chat and bad jokes, but what the hell. This was what the gig was all about right?

Having frozen their bits off for 45 minutes, the lads gave way to The Harvey’s Boys, a couple of English based performers who performed a few numbers as they usually do, all to good effect.

An all too short injection of glamour to proceedings followed as a young lady called, er Heather I think, bravely took over with an unaccompanied version of KT Tunstall’s  ‘Other side of the World.’ What a lovely voice she had. I know I could have listened to far more than the one number she sang.

The final guest act was the irrepressible Ian MacFarlane. He is a showman supreme and blessed with a voice that is equally at home doing Steve Earle country rock style or big band classics. In truth he gave us all a selection of both in his segment of the show, a section that was generally well received by the cooling crowd.

With the temperature now hovering marginally above freezing Yard of Ale returned to close the gig and a rousing finale it was. More of their traditional set list with a couple of older numbers thrown in for good measure was the fare and as with the opening set the crowd loved it and virtually all stayed to the bitter end, bitter as in cold of course. I am in awe that they could still feel their fingers let alone play instruments with them.

And that was that. At least for 2011. Hopefully if all goes according to plan we will be back again next year for more of the same. How about you?

                        Reviewed by Geoff Evans                                          one 4 review

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